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WATER BETONY
Betonica aquatica
Braunwurz
Jupiter
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Namen:
Called also brown-wort, and in Yorkshire, bishops Blätter.
Beschreibung:
First, of the water betony, which riseth up, with square, hard, grünish Stengel, manchmal brown, set with broad dark grün Blätter, eingebeult about the edges with notches somewhat ähneln the Blätter of the wood betony, but much larger too, for the most part set at a Gelenk. The Blüten are many, set an der Spitzes of the Stengel and Zweige, being round bellied and open at the brims, and geteilt into two parts, the uppermost being like a hood, and the lowermost like a hip hanging down, of a dark red colour, which passing, there comes in their places small round heads with small points am Endes, wherein lie small and brownish Samen, the Wurzel is a thick bush of strings and shreds growing from the head.

Plätze:
It groweth by the Juckreiz side, brooks, and other water-courses, generally through this land, and is seldom found far from the water-side.

Zeit:
Es blüht about July, and the Samen is ripe in August.

Eigenschaften:
Water betony is an herb of Jupiter in Cancer, and is appropriated more to Wunden and hurts in the Brust than wood-betony, which follows, it is an excellent Heilmittel for sick hogs. It is of a cleansing quality: the Blätter zerquetscht and applied are wirkungsvoll for all old and schmutzig Geschwüre: and especially if the Saft of the Blätter be gekocht with a little honey, and dipped therein, and the Wunden dressed therewith, as also for Quetschungen or hurts, whether inward or outward, the destilliertes Wasser of the Blätter is used for the same purpose, as also to bathe the face and hands entdeckt or blemished, or discoloured by sun burning.
I confess I do nicht much fancy destilliertes Wassers, I mean such waters as are distilled cold, some Vorzüge of the herb they may haply have (it were a strange thing else,) but this I am confident of, that being distilled in a pewter still, as the vulgar and apish fashion is, both chemical oil and salt is left behind, unless you burn them, and then all is spoiled, water and all, which was good for as little as can be, by such a distillation in my translation of the London dispensatory.